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A team of astronomers was able to observe for the first time as a massive black hole fed on an accumulation of intergalactic gas clouds, a fabulous cosmic climate phenomenon seen through the telescope ALMA, located in northern Chile. Astronomers have captured the big black hole, located in the center of a giant galaxy a billion light-years from Earth, when she swallowed a ‘intergalactic flood “, which constitutes the proof of a new food habit of these black holes. Until now, experts believed that the supermassive black holes fed ionized gas coming from the brightness of the galaxy, a process known by experts as ‘accretion’. But “the new observation ALMA shows that when the weather conditions are given, black holes can also absorb giants and chaotic very cold molecular gas clouds accumulations,” said a statement released on Wednesday by the Centre, located in the desert Atacama.

“This is one of the first clear evidence that an observatory gives us on a supermassive black hole that eats a cold and chaotic rain,” said Fore Tremblay, an astronomer at Yale University in the United States, who participated in the finding. According to Tremblay, cold and dense clouds can merge from the hot intergalactic gas and fall directly into the heart of a galaxy where the central black hole begins to feed.

ALMA telescope has captured three clouds of gas traveling at a 300 kilometers per second to be devoured by the black hole. Astronomers argue that there may be a thousand clouds similar nearby that could keep feeding the black hole much longer. Astronomers plan to use ALMA to continue seeking these “rain” in other galaxies, in order to determine whether this is such a common phenomenon as suggested by current theory. These resulted appear in the journal Nature on 9 June 2016. The Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (ALMA), is today the largest radio telescope in the world, is located in the north of the country, has 66 antennas and is controlled by an international association of Europe, North America and east Asia in cooperation with Chile.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.