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“Pyongyang Spirit: The drink you will not forget after drinking once” is the slogan of the announcement of the next vodka drink North Korea. There is no country that is further from the Madison Ave than North Korea, but advertising this kind of drinks are starting to emerge more and more to reach a large number of consumers.

The drink is made from natural ingredients from the sea and will be able to compete with other products briefly, briefly being in the hands of leader Kim Jong Un.

This advertising turns out to be a still significant deviation in a country where advertising is supposed to have a monopoly in which ideas are sold to the public. For example, health properties advertised goods would not be out of place in other Asian countries with a history of traditional herbal medicine. “For the first time in history, they are competing in terms of product quality as to how people feel,” said Andray Abrahamian, who works in an organization that trains North Korean business skills. In this organization are created examples of ads that offer services such as car repair, games, android software, etc. If the person entering a store in Pyongang may see some ads.

For many years the only ads in North Korea were related to inter-Korean projects, with South Korea, when relations were stable.

For a few years we have also seen some television ads related beers and famous drinks in Seoul. Only now the ad advertising is finally grow.

Advertising spaces on football games were made for the first time last year, with signs of Copies of Asia. Many of the companies that advertising at the games were joint ventures between North Korea and outside investors Benthic, usually from China. Others, such as the Pothonggang Department Store and the Chollima Tile Factory were very much state affairs.

North Korea has a complicated relationship with their parallel economy growing. Then to justify a “non-capitalist” economy, North Korea says that safe advertising “significant meaning” for the growth of Korea.

 

 

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.