BRISBANE, QSL - JULY 21: Dinosaur bones are pictured. The bones were discovered as part of the largest haul of dinosaur bones found in Australia July 21, 2005 in Brisbane Australia. The haul, from the outback town of Winton, consists of around 80 bones from the cretaceous Sauropod, a four-legged, plant-eating dinosaur more than 30 metres tall. The bones included metre-long ribs, shoulder and hip bones, and are estimated to be at least 95 million years old. (Photo by Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images)
BRISBANE, QSL – JULY 21: Dinosaur bones are pictured. The bones were discovered as part of the largest haul of dinosaur bones found in Australia July 21, 2005 in Brisbane Australia. The haul, from the outback town of Winton, consists of around 80 bones from the cretaceous Sauropod, a four-legged, plant-eating dinosaur more than 30 metres tall. The bones included metre-long ribs, shoulder and hip bones, and are estimated to be at least 95 million years old. (Photo by Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images)

Bill Shipp found the skeletal remains of a dinosaur on his Montana ranch a decade ago, and while he is not a paleontologist or a dinosaur enthusiast, he baptized the horned dinosaur as Judith, and researchers point out that that particular specimen didn’t have it easy.

On the first look, the leg bones on the front state that the dinosaur had advanced arthritis, causing excruciating pain while walking and a large hole in her skull seems like it was made by a dinosaur of the same species as Judith, which can point to fighting.

Although this is the case, what caused Judith’s demise was a predator attack, as she was covered in huge teeth marks.

Further analysis to her growth rings on her shin bones made researchers conclude she was resilient and survived the horned attack and illnesses, and now she goes on display after 76 million years after her passing, to represent her on species at the Canadian Museum of Nature.

Judith is a relative of the popular triceratops and her species weighted somewhere along the lines of the weight between an elephant and a rhinoceros.

The horns were, of course, for self-defense, and her neck armor would keep predators away from her fragile neck.

Researchers thank the find as it introduced a new dinosaur species and helped them continue to assemble the pieces that allow humanity to paint a picture of the ecosystem back in those days, as well as how everything connected.

 

 

 

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.