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The astronomer José Ramón Valdés, the astrophysicists Coordination of the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, said on Saturday that the event to be seen and heard in the early hours of Saturday was passing through the atmosphere of a meteorite that cut the skies of central from Mexico.

At a news conference, the scientist said that the interaction of the object with the atmosphere generated a shock wave that is visible and noticeable to the public. Despite felt and seen as a close phenomenon, the astronomer said the meteorite must have passed more than 1,000 kilometers in altitude.

“The big asteroids can be monitored; we can see its presence in the solar system. The problem is small, these cannot see,” said Valdés. He explained that “these objects are remnants of the formation of the solar system, our planet,” why are scientific importance to reconstruct the history of the planetary system to which belongs the earth.

Valdés also explained that it is objects that can be formed by rock or metal, and that this morning “everything indicates that it was of little stone.” “There are many, but few reach the surface You have to be prepared for a big. Those are mortal and would end with a city inclusive, and are the ones that are monitoring,” specified the expert.

This morning, the SkyAlert alerts platform reported an accompanied brightness of a crash was recorded in central Mexico, and attributed the phenomenon to a possible “fireball or meteor.” The SkyAklert an unofficial platform that warns of seismic, volcanic and atmospheric phenomena, detailed through the Twitter network around 1:47 a.m. local time “we saw a light and heard an explosion,” and added that reports the fact arriving from Puebla, Mexico City, State of Mexico and Tlaxcala.

“It is very likely that the explosion as possible ‘bolide meteor or’ occurred during its entry into Earth’s atmosphere. No damage was reported, so it is also not likely to impact on the ground,” he said. Others felt at home as a rumble that vibrated doors, windows and walls. “If you listened to as if something had exploded,” said Julián Peña, who was at home, in a telephone conversation with Efe.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.