biohacking

Contact lenses that allow see in the dark, computer chips implanted in the body and sensors. These elements that remind us of science fiction films not only are already part of our reality as it promises to be a trend for the future.

Researchers believe that the practice will lead to the creation of a new human race and eventually to immortality. For the futurologist World Academy for Arts and Science, Ian Pearson, 2050 the “Homo Optimus” species, which is a hybrid between humans and robots will be walking around.

“With optimized genomes and organisms enhanced by links with external technology, people could be more beautiful, more intelligent, more sophisticated emotionally, physically more capable, more socially connected, generally healthier and happier,” he says.

The technique still shocks many people by the way is made. Besides not being fully approved by medicine, it gains adherents who do experiments on their own. Ellen Jorgensen, one of the creators of the DIY biotech movement, or “do it yourself” and founder of Genspace – A biotech laboratory nonprofit – explains that the idea is to make accessible biotechnology to ordinary people, not just scientists and those who work in government laboratories.

“Putting technology in the user’s hands is a good idea because they know more clearly what their needs are,” he explains. She also noted that the intention is not to create a new version of Frankenstein or over, by accident, developing a biological weapon.

“The United States published a report in this area, where it was concluded that the potential of this technology to the well is much larger than the negative risk. Also, it was taken into account DYIbio communities (do-it-yourself biology) and noted that the press has a tendency to overestimate our abilities and our ethics. In fact, DIY individuals from around the world came together in 2011 to create a common code of ethics. This is much more than conventional science has done, “he says.

Still, it is important to remember that implanted devices, for example, may contain toxic materials like batteries that can end up leaking and damaging the user’s health.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.