iOS-10-1

One new feature of iOS 10, released on Monday by Apple, has beaten many but promises to be the joy of those who suffer from the lack of internal memory on iPhones. The company will finally release the possibility of removing native applications on the new system, which will be released for all users by the end of the year. Who says this is Apple itself, which launched a page to show the 23 apps that will benefit from the new.

The list includes the Friends apps, Exchange, Compass, Calculator, Calendar, Contacts, Tips, FaceTime, Recorder Home, iBooks, iCloud Drive, iTunes Store, Reminders, Mail, Maps, Music, News, Notes, Podcasts, Weather, Videos, and Watch.

To remove one or more of these native apps on iOS 10, tap and hold the app icon on the Home screen until it vibrates; tap the X icon in the app the corner and then click Remove; press the Home button to finish.

To restore it, it is the normal App Store way: inside, look for the desired application, tap the download icon (a cloud with an arrow) and restore it. After downloading, it will be back to the home screen.

But the news also comes with a bit of “terrorism” by Apple. The company warns: “When you remove a native app, you also remove any related user data and configuration files This can affect things as system-related functions or information about your Apple Watch.”.

Some examples of what may happen: if you have an Apple Watch paired with the iPhone, removing a cell from these apps will also remove the same app on Watch. If you delete the Exchange or Time apps, notifications brought by them on your iPhone Notification Center will also disappear.

In addition, Apple says: “applications built into iOS are designed to be very efficient in space because all of them together use less than 150 MB.”

In 2014, the iOS 8 caused a stir among users because of its excessive size. He was about 5 GB and occupied more than half of the iPhone 5C memory, it was still sold at the time. But in fact, Apple has learned from the error and version 9 of iOS it was much smaller, with 1.3 GB.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.