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Last week, many people were shocked with the Twitter user video Kabir Alli, which went viral to show a search for “three black youth” and then “three white youths” with totally different results. In the first images of seizures and bandits, while in the second case were white happy young, well-dressed and without anything negative. The scope of the post was huge, with 67,687 retweets. Alli told The Guardian that friends suggested the research, but that he saw with his own eyes was in shock. But he added he did not think Google is racist, as many accused. “The results are formed by the set algorithm. They are not racist, but I think they should have more control over these issues,” he says. For him, if the company has so many rules and supervision to ads and the content that will appear in other applications, they should not be positioned in such “neutrality” with regard to images.

Google said that the search results are a reflection of the internet, including the frequency with which the images appear and how they are described. “This means that sometimes unpleasant or delicate portraits content may appear in some searches. This does not reflect the views of Google. As a company, we very much value the diversity of perspectives, ideas and cultures,” he said in a statement. Unfortunately, this is just one case. Recently, the student Bonnie Komona searched for “hair styles to work” and had the same surprise. In non-professional styles, they appeared only black with african hair as the results themselves “professionals” only white appeared.

In the past, Google has come to intervene in controversial cases, such as the black youth who received gorillas tag suggestions, then the company publicly apologized. There was also the removal of an image comparing Michelle Obama also a gorilla.

The current logic of Google, we will only see black positive images when people are looking for and writing positive things black. It is clear that no interference in the results has the financial and corporate interest.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.