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The 19th edition of the International Fair of High Technology, held in Beijing, was in the spotlight a very special coach. Rollover cars, carrying 1,200 people, it costs one-fifth the price of a subway carriage and is still clean, it moves electricity and solar energy. Called Transit Elevated Bus (TEB), it is still only on paper, but the concept has already aroused much attention in China Beijing International High-Tech Expo, held from the past 19 and 22 May.

The concept was unveiled for six years and the first tests are scheduled for the second half of this year, the city of Qinhuangdao City, Hebei Province, in the north. Bai Zhiming, an engineer in charge of the project, says he can do it in a year, if approved.

This mega-bus was designed to solve one of the major problems of Chinese urban life: traffic congestion. To that combines other advantages. And just as well, for work mainly in three aspects: as has its own rails and passes over the cars can continue their journey without problems, even if the traffic is stopped; Shooting creates more space for other vehicles; and reduces pollution. The TEB carries up to 1,200, leaving the roof, through an elevator system that leaves the various stops of the bus route. It is these same stops you can also enter other passengers.

If there is an accident, they are triggered immediate emergency brakes and TEB stops. In these cases, the output system by the roof does not work because there is a platform where passengers leave. But it’s thought, in these circumstances, open up a “slides” side, where people can leave – similar to what happens in airplanes. This exhaust system also has an indoor water slide, in case it is not possible – or safe – leaving the wings. It is presented as an urban transport technology highly efficient and low-carbon, since it is powered by electricity and solar energy.

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He was born in California, US. He graduated from California University with a degree in Computer Sciences, and now works for Reuters and running this Weekly Newspaper. Alongside his day jobs in Reuters, McDonald is also broadcasting a Weekly Gazette.